The Entertainment Industry is going through a tsunami of change. It's almost impossible for companies to know how to plan for the coming year, much less five years down the line. New technologies, globalization, shrinking post schedules and a vast proliferation of new distribution platforms have dramatically affected how to plan for survival and success in the future.

Globally, competitive operations and markets relentlessly push companies to cut costs and streamline their operations while simultaneously producing more with less. And while the expanded use of technology both energizes and streamlines existing systems, it also creates new challenges and complexity that spirals up and down the production chain. Should companies partner with international entities in order to take advantage of tax breaks and lower wage scales? And how best to create efficient worldwide pipelines without always starting from scratch and spending a fortune?

Additionally, post schedules are growing ever shorter and on-time delivery of crucial elements needed to meet a movie’s marketing demands and even its opening date are becoming riskier than ever. With these pressures growing on each and every project, what impact does this relentless time constriction and ever expanding shot count have on companies and artists who work to meet those deadlines and demands?

Distribution models are also undergoing significant change with countless new and shrinking platforms arriving almost daily. How does this impact your business and how can you plan to compete successfully in the future?

These are all realities that are happening now. How do you fit in? Now is not the time to stand still and do nothing. This is not the time to watch from the sidelines. This is not the time to become a dinosaur. How can we get creatives, technologists and those holding the purse strings to work together to create a future for us all?

October 23, 2010 - Ritz Carlton Marina del Rey, CA

Video Gallery

Watch the Entire 2010 Production Summit
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Photo Gallery

Featured Speaker

Dr. Rich Terrile - NASA/JPL Astronomer and Evolutionary Computation Designer

Panel Discussion

DOES IT COME WITH WHEELS? How Pushing the On-Set Tech Envelope Affects Your Business

Major industry identifiers are telling us to change. Pre-postproduction is now a common term on-set. Smaller, faster, cheaper technology, aggressive timelines, unrealistic budgets and unrelenting competition are all prompting us to do something different. With the proliferation of the digital cinema/HD cameras, the post industry is now much closer to actual content capture. With all this technology creeping nearer to the director and cinematographer, we’re heading toward an unprecedented intertwining of relationships between creatives, technologists and manufacturers.

If this becomes the new operating paradigm, what kind of business model is needed – do producers need to budget for more resources up front? Should greater creative collaboration between creatives, producers and technologists in the pre-production phase become even more pronounced? Ultimately, what will working on-set in the future look like and how will ever-advancing changes in technology impact creative decisions and everyone’s bottom line?

Moderator:

  • Ron Prince - Editor, British Cinematographer / Managing Director, Prince PR

Panelists:

  • Michael Bravin - Vice President of Market Development for ARRI, Inc.
  • Jon Ferguy - Co-Owner, Sohonet
  • Dan Germain - WW Strategic Business Dev., DVS Digital Video Inc.
  • Mark Jaszberenyi - Founder, Colorfront
  • David Morin - Consultant, Autodesk / Chair, Joint Technology Committee on Virtual Production
  • Jonas Thaler - SrVP Post Production, Anschutz Film Group/Walden Media

Lunch

Conversation and Collaboration

Keynote Speaker

Bill Mechanic - Producer and CEO,Pandemonium Films

Interviewed by Steven Gaydos, Executive Editor, Variety

Panel Discussion

TOMORROW'S PRODUCTION RENAISSANCE: Adapting to Ever-Changing Roles

As pre-production, production and post-production methods blur, so too do traditional craft roles. Today more than ever, the roles of executives, visual effects professionals, production designers, animators, cinematographers, editors and even wardrobe and makeup artists are starting to converge. How can one maximize their creativity in this new infrastructure? How does one move fluidly between narrative, hybrid and animation? And what do creative professionals need to know as the entire process shifts to a more blended world? What roles will be part of production in the future and how early in the process do such decisions need to be made? How does all this change impact business decisions?

Moderator:

Panelists:

Panel Discussion

THE MADONNA APPROACH: The Only Constant is Change

The industry is in a state of flux. Traditional barometers are being knocked about by globalization, creative mandates, technology advances and financing challenges. The list is long. 3D – shoot in 3D, convert to 3D or remain in 2D, and how to capitalize on the trend. International Opportunities and Tax Incentives – open satellite offices or partner up with another company abroad. Animation v. Hybrid v. VFX – better to remain with one core service or diversify to attract more business. The Hub Approach – become or remain a behemoth company or offer centralizing management of outside services. Creating Your Own Content – assessing risks, rewards and new distribution options. Standardization – files, formats, pipelines, positions. Company Size – does size matter. Niche Expertise – be the ‘go to’ company with one great strength or diversify your company’s skill sets. Being Green – is addressing environmental concerns financially feasible.

The panel will discuss a myriad of topics and look at how companies and individuals can stay relevant, make good decisions and stay ahead of the next trend. How would you approach the above concerns?

Moderator:

Panelists:

Round Up and Q&A

Cocktails and Social Hour

Cocktails by the pool.

Press Coverage